Lessons From Reading 600+ Books & Connecting Big Ideas With The Latticework | Blas Moros on The Reader’s Journey

Check out The Reader’s Journey Episode Page & Show Notes

Key Takeaways

  • “Everything you learn comes back to help you in some way, shape, or form” – Blas Moros
  • How does Blas read 5-10 books a month while handling a full-time job, an 18-month old baby, and sleeping 8 hours a day?
    • He sets aside an hour every morning just for reading and rarely misses it
      • “That consistency day in day out is for me what’s made the biggest difference” – Blas Moros
  • If your phone is more attractive than a book you’re reading, you may want to find another book:
    • “If a book doesn’t draw my attention enough for me to be willing to put down my phone then it’s a problem with the book or my interest in that topic” – Blas Moros
  • Don’t feel guilty about quitting a book or feel the need to force yourself to finish a book you aren’t enjoying. The world is filled with amazing books, quit bad books and move on to better ones:
    • “There’s a bit of sunk cost in that but much, much better to move on to something else that really does pull you in” – Blas Moros
  • Blas recommends readers to sometimes take a break from jumping from one book to the next and instead take some time to reflect on what you’ve read 
    • “For me, taking a moment to step back and pause and get a big picture overview…has been more beneficial than reading the marginal book”Blas Moros
  • Every now and then, instead of reading a new book, reread a book that changed your life
    • “Rather than finding that new shiny thing…Revisiting those classics is often as beneficial if not more so” – Blas Moros
      • If there’s a book you loved, reread it by listening to the audiobook version of it
  • Just as no man steps in the same river twice, no man reads the same book twice. When you reread one of your favorite books, you may spot parts that weren’t interesting to you the first time around.

Intro

Books Mentioned

About Blas Moros & The Rabbit Hole

  • Blas started playing tennis competitively when he was 10. He played in college but didn’t make it into the pros. 
    • Suddenly, Blas found he had a lot more time and decided to spend it reading and learning
      • “Instead of going to the courts or the gym, I would go to the library and sit and study and read” – Blas Moros
  • For the past 7 years, Blas has been reading books and writing summaries on his website The Rabbit Hole
    • Why does Blas write summaries of the books he’s read?
      • It saves him time from having to reread the book months or years later
      • The notes provide other readers with a high-level overview of a book they’re considering which helps them decide whether or not a book is a match for them
        • “Everything you learn comes back to help you in some way, shape, or form” – Blas Moros

Advice on Reading More & Better

  • How does Blas decide what book to read next?
    • Blas chooses his books based on a blend of serendipity and planning
      • Sometimes he comes across a book that speaks to him and buys it and dives into it right away. Other times, he follows his Amazon wishlist or if a book gets recommended multiple times by his friends, he’ll bite the bullet and order it.
  • How does Blas read 5-10 books a month while handling a full-time job, an 18-month old baby, and sleeping 8 hours a day?
    • He sets aside an hour every morning just for reading and rarely misses it
      • “That consistency day in day out is for me what’s made the biggest difference” – Blas Moros
  • If your phone is more attractive than a book you’re reading, you may want to find another book:
    • “If a book doesn’t draw my attention enough for me to be willing to put down my phone then it’s a problem with the book or my interest in that topic” – Blas Moros
  • Don’t feel guilty about quitting a book or feel the need to force yourself to finish a book you aren’t enjoying. The world is filled with amazing books, quit bad books and move on to better ones:
    • “There’s a bit of sunk cost in that but much, much better to move on to something else that really does pull you in” – Blas Moros
  • What book medium does Blas prefer?
    • Blas prefers to mostly read print books because it’s the easiest format to take notes in
    • But he also listens to audiobooks when he wants to reread and book and will read an ebook when he wants to do some light reading before going to bed

How To Take Notes While Reading

  • How does Blas take notes while reading?
    • While reading a book, Blas will highlight the text, jot down notes in the margins, and summarize key lessons on the front page of the book
    • Once he finishes a book, he’ll type up his notes into Evernote and then paste it onto his website
      • Your note-taking system doesn’t have to be overly complex, oftentimes the simpler the better
  • How does Blas use his book summaries to his advantage?
    • At the end of each month, Blas spends time reviewing the notes of all the books he’s read that month. He’ll bold the most important lessons so that he can quickly spot them next time he’s looking at his notes.
      • At the end of the year, he uses the whole month of December to review everything he’s read in that year to refresh the most valuable lessons he’s learned and make connections across the books he’s read. 
  • Blas recommends readers to sometimes take a break from jumping from one book to the next and instead take some time to reflect on what you’ve read 
    • “For me, taking a moment to step back and pause and get a big picture overview…has been more beneficial than reading the marginal book”Blas Moros

More Helpful Reading Advice

  • Every now and then, instead of reading a new book, reread a book that changed your life
    • “Rather than finding that new shiny thing…Revisiting those classics is often as beneficial if not more so” – Blas Moros
      • If there’s a book you loved, reread it by listening to the audiobook version of it
  • Just as no man steps in the same river twice, no man reads the same book twice. When you reread one of your favorite books, you may spot parts that weren’t interesting to you the first time around.
  • What books are a good fit for you will depend on what books you’ve already read, what phase of life you’re in, what problems you’re currently facing, and much more
  • Blas cites a Naval Ravikant quote to help guide people on their reading journey: “Read what you love until you love to read”

More Educational Content from Blas

  • In addition to book summaries, Blas also shares reference guides and essays on his website
    • The goal of these pieces is to go an inch wide but a mile deep. In other words, Blas likes to do a dive deep into a subject or person that fascinates him and share what he learned about them.
      • “What I’m attempting to do here is to make multiple books into a blog post” – Blas Moros

The Infinite Game

  • Blas has a wonderful essay titled The Infinite Game. It’s geared towards student-athletes who are transitioning out of the sports world into the “real world.”
    • In the essay, Blas shares advice on the importance of defining success for yourself, why you want to identify your values early on in life, what to look for in a job, and more
  • The essay was inspired by James Carse’s book Finite and Infinite Games
    • The book teaches readers that there are two types of games in life: 
    • Finite games have a winner and loser and are zero-sum
    • Infinite games are games played for fun or where multiple people can win

The Opportunity Paradox

  • This essay was a way for Blas to explore several paradoxes and share how they can be advantageous to your life if applied correctly
  • A few paradoxes from the essay:
    • Give It To Get It: The more you give in life, you more you’ll get. Life is a series of multiple games and those who are constantly giving to others will be rewarded for it in the long run.
    • The Overflowing Cup: Those who love themselves and don’t need attention often get more of it while those who crave such things never feel full enough.
    • Enlightened Self-interest: One of the best ways to help others is to find an activity that you selfishly enjoy doing
      • Ex: Blas writes book summaries to help himself remember what he’s read, but the summaries also help other people
    • Discipline Equals Freedom: To reach your goals, you need to have the discipline to not let your emotions, impulses, or desires dictate your actions

The Latticework

  • The name Latticework comes from Charlie Munger
    • Charlie says that you need a Latticework of mental models in your head to make them useful
      • “If you understand one concept or idea really well, it’s easier to understand the next idea by relating it back” – Blas Moros
  • The Latticework will be an online multidisciplinary learning resource and community
    • It aims to interconnect and explain valuable ideas by guiding people through a learning roadmap
  • Two valuable concepts readers can learn from the website:
    • First-principle thinking: Breaking down complicated problems into basic elements and then reassembling them from the ground up
      • Ex: Elon Musk keep asking why rockets were so expensive and realized it was because rockets weren’t reusable. So, he created SpaceX with the goal of producing reusable rockets.
    • Second-order principles: Thinking about the consequences of an action and seeing how it will affect other areas 

Additional Notes

The Reader's Journey : , , , , ,
Notes By Alex Wiec

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