Jaw-Dropping Behavior Science Meets Creative Marketing | Richard Shotton on Modern Wisdom

Key Takeaways

  • The biggest goal of an ad is to get noticed–-if people don’t see your ad, they won’t discover your product or service
  • People more likely notice your ad if they’re in a good mood
    • People also rate ads 50% more likable when they’re in a good mood rather than a bad one
  • Important Psychological Effects to Inform Marketing Efforts:
    • Von Restorff Effect: When similar stimuli are presented, the stimulus that differs from the rest is more likely to be remembered.
    • Red Sneaker Effect: People who wear offbeat clothes in a professional setting are often perceived as having a higher status 
    • Generation Effect: A phenomenon where information is better remembered if it is generated from one’s own mind rather than simply read
    • Rhyme-as-Reason Effect: People find phrases that rhyme more believable than non-rhyming phrases
    • Negative Social Proof: If you make a bad behavior seem common, you’re likely to see more people commit that bad behavior
    • The Peak–end Rule: People judge an experience largely based on how they felt at its peak (i.e., its most intense point) and at its end
    • Risk Homeostasis Theory: People adjust their behavior in response to the perceived level of risk, becoming more careful where they sense greater risk and less careful if they feel more protected

Intro

  • Richard Shotton (@rshotton) is an author, consultant, conference speaker, and trainer
    • His work focuses on applying findings from psychology and behavioral science to marketing. 
  • Host – Chris Williamson (@Chriswillx)

Books Mentioned

How To Get Your Ad Noticed

  • The biggest goal of an ad is to get noticed–if people don’t see your ad, they won’t discover your product or service
    • The best way to get your ad noticed is to make it distinctive
      • In psychology, this is called the Von Restorff effect: when similar stimuli are presented, the stimulus that differs from the rest is more likely to be remembered.
        • E.g.: If you give people a list of letters and just a few numbers interspersed, people are more likely to remember the numbers than the letters
      • To take advantage of this effect: list all the norms in your category, identify which ones you have to adhere to, and figure out which traditional norms you can break to make your ad stick out 
  • 91% of digital ads are looked at for less than a second
    • This is why it’s so important to make your ad unique!
      • “Marketers take noticeability for granted” –  Richard Shotton

Want More Eyeballs? Put People In A Good Mood 

  • People more likely notice your ad if they’re in a good mood
    • People also rate ads 50% more likable when they’re in a good mood rather than a bad one
      • When you’re in a good mood, you’re more optimistic and focus on the benefit of a product instead of its cost 
    • One researcher found they can predict someone’s mood based on their mouse movement: smooth mouse movement means a person is in a good mood while jagged movement means they’re likely in a bad mood
  • Try to apply the good mood theory to your ad strategy:
    • Advertise on comedy shows instead of on the subway
    • Create ads with humor or likeable characters

More Psychological Effects

  • Red Sneaker Effect: People who wear offbeat clothes in a professional setting are often perceived as having a higher status 
    • E.g.: Mark Zuckerberg in his gray shirt or Steve Jobs in black turtleneck and jeans
  • Generation Effect: A phenomenon where information is better remembered if it is generated from one’s own mind rather than simply read
    • If you give someone a list of animals, they process it too quickly and it washes over, but if you give them that same list with a couple letters missing from each animal, the brain has to process that information and it becomes more memorable 
  • Rhyme-as-Reason Effect: People find phrases that rhyme more believable than non-rhyming phrases
    • E.g.: When people were given a list of made-up proverbs, they found the rhyming proverbs as more believable
      • People are also more likely to remember a rhyming phrase than a non-rhyming phrase
  • Negative Social Proof: If you make a bad behavior seem common, you’re likely to see more people commit that bad behavior
    • E.g.: In one study, a sign said ‘14 tons of wood are being stolen every year and it’s ruining this park,’ and it actually increased the theft rate because it made people think that if other people are doing something wrong, it can’t be that bad
      • When the sign said, ‘Don’t steal it’s wrong,’ theft rates went down 
  • People don’t mind waiting in a line as long as they have something to do and waiting in line is less painful if people are given an estimated waiting time
    • Disney is a master at this: At their theme parks, they tell people how long they’re going to have a wait in line for a ride and they overestimate it so people feel the line is moving faster than expected
  • The Peak–end Rule: People judge an experience largely based on how they felt at its peak (i.e., its most intense point) and at its end
    • You want to make the end of an experience positive so people have positive feelings about your service
  • Risk Homeostasis Theory: People adjust their behavior in response to the perceived level of risk, becoming more careful where they sense greater risk and less careful if they feel more protected
    • For example, people tend to drive closer to the vehicle in front when the car was fitted with anti-lock brakes

How To Be More Believable

  • Trust in advertisers is low, but it’s always been low–here’s how to increase trust with consumers:
    • Make big public announcements 
      • “The more public a statement, the more believable it is” – Richard Shotton
    • Make people feel you put high amounts of money behind your campaign
      • There’s an idea called costly signaling that the believability of a message rises as the cost goes up

Additional Notes

  • Sex toy sales are up 71% in Italy since the COVID-19 crisis
  • “Don’t try to make a quick buck out of people’s desperation”Richard Shotton
    • If you’re caught raising prices during a crisis, people will go to big lengths to punish you because they view it as unfair
Modern Wisdom : , , ,
Notes By Alex Wiec

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