mind pump strength training

1404: The Importance of Hand Position When Exercising the Triceps, What To Do If You Are Always Hungry, the Fallacy That Partial Reps Help Save Joints & More | Mind Pump

Key Takeaways

  • Triceps have nothing to do with wrist rotation: supinated versus pronated grip will not have an impact on the efficacy of a triceps exercise
  • Partial reps have a place in the context of a limited range of motion but the goal should always be to build a full range of motion
  • Always train to the fullest range of motion you have control over
  • If working with partial reps include correctional movements to improve the functional range of motion
  • Lack of hydration can make you think you are hungry
  • Tips if you’re always hungry: make sure you are drinking enough water, eat smaller meals throughout the day with snacks between
  • A good chiropractor is a movement specialist who will explain movement patterns and offer correctional exercises, not just lay you on the table for adjustments week after week

Introduction

The Mind Pump hosts are Sal Di Stefano (IG: @mindpumpsal), Adam Schafer (IG: @mindpumpadam) and Justin Andrews (IG: @mindpumpjustin).

In this episode, hosts Sal, Adam & Justin answer listener questions about different grips for triceps exercises, whether partial reps save joints, strategies to manage a big appetite, and the pros and cons of seeing a chiropractor.

Supinated Vs Pronated Grip For Triceps Exercises

  • For results, it doesn’t matter whether you use supinated or prone grip for triceps exercises
  • Recruitment patterns may change with different positions but it won’t impact the efficacy of gains
  • Triceps have nothing to do with wrist rotation, unlike biceps
  • It may feel differently because supination and pronation both change elbow position
  • It’s more important to manipulate elbow position and try exercises with elbows at your side, elbows overhead (like in skull crusher), and in front

Fact Or Fiction: Partial Reps To Save Joints

  • Partial reps versus full reps is an individualized decision
  • You want to train in the fullest range of motion you have control over
  • If you have poor mobility, it could be better to hit a quarter squat with good form than a poor rep of a full squat
  • You don’t want to train poor movement patterns
  • Include exercise and correctional movements to improve the functional range of motion
  • If you are using partial reps, the goal is to build to full reps – not stay there
  • Partial reps have a place in the context of the limited range of motion but outside of that, joints will be more vulnerable if that’s all you’re training
  • Don’t limit the range of motion if you are physically capable to perform the full range of motion
  • Not moving joints to fullest capacity speeds up degradation and risk of injury  

Tips To Manage A Big Appetite

  • Eating more frequently tends to help: three meals with small snacks in between
  • Increase protein intake for satiety
  • Eat a serving of protein first then move on to other macronutrients
  • Sample meal: steak and sweet potato – high protein, good fat, a healthy carb
  • Lack of hydration can make you think you are hungry
  • Make sure water intake is high
  • Experiment with feelings of hunger by fasting and understand the difference between a craving and actual hunger

Pros and Cons of Chiropractor

  • There are some excellent chiropractors and many who are really bad
  • Chiropractics makes a big leap between correctly identifying that the central nervous system is responsible for most of the body functions and jumping to spinal alignment as the cure
  • Bad chiropractor: will adjust you on the table week after week which may give you good relief but isn’t identifying the root cause
  • A good chiropractor is a movement specialist
  • Good chiropractor: will not adjust you but will have you walk, squat, and get into various positions to guide you to better movement patterns
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Notes By Maryann

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