Hunger and Greatness | Chris Bosh on The Knowledge Project Podcast with Shane Parrish

Check out The Knowledge Project Podcast Episode Page

Key Takeaways

  • Hunger came from not having resources as other kids had what Chris Bosh wanted
    • “Now it’s about the glory, the name on the back of my jersey, it’s about me establishing who I am,” – Chris Bosh
    • It was about putting everything into the game and hoping to get something in return
  • Emulation becomes a part of you, when you stop thinking about it; you put your own spin on it
    • “The ultimate pinnacle for the athlete is to go out there and express yourself without thinking,” – Chris Bosh
  • Bosh believes that you make better decisions with snap judgments, instead of over-analyzing
  • The fundamentals are the keys to greatness
    • Many great NBA players do not get enough credit for their fundamentals
    • The reason Michael Jordan was so successful was because of his fundamentals (how he disabled other players with angles and footwork)
  • The big secret is to work now and worry later (do not look worried on the court, mid-game)
    • Evaluate what you did wrong, but only after it is all over
    • Meanwhile, keep your presence on the court
  • The days you don’t feel like it, those are the days you have to work
    • That is when the magic happens

Books Mentioned

Intro

  • Chris Bosh (T: @chrisbosh and IG: @chrisbosh) is a two-time NBA champion, a five-time NBA All-Star, and Basketball Hall of Fame inductee
    • He joins The Knowledge Project Podcast to discuss what it takes to become a champion
    • Check out Bosh’ website
  • Host- Shane Parrish (@ShaneAParrish)

Chris Bosh and His Love for Basketball

  • Bosh names his parents as a significant influence
    • His father played in the church leagues
  • Michael Jordan and Chicago Bulls fascinated Bosh as a kid
  • The entire world disappeared when he watched basketball. It was just him and the television
    • That is the moment he knew he wanted to be a basketball player

All Eyez on Me

  • How to deal with pressure at a young age?
    • When everyone is watching you, that is the time to make mistakes
    • That is the time you think about failure
  • Bosh did not care about the pressure and the people watching, as he only cared about his goals
    • He was so focused and there was nothing he wanted more than becoming a professional basketball player
  • “Every inch of my being was towards that goal,” – Chris Bosh
  • He noticed people treat you differently when you excel at something
    • He was getting the confirmations (the exterior treatment) and realized that he wanted to be an athlete
    • When he was in the 4th grade, people would say: “Chris Bosh can play basketball”
    • It made him feel good that people smiled/enjoyed seeing him play

Where Does Hunger Come From?

  • How to persevere even when you don’t feel like doing it?
  • Bosh wanted to be the best that he could be – that was his main objective
  • Hunger came from not having resources, as other kids had what Bosh wanted:
    • Better education
    • PlayStation
    • They did not have to share their rooms with siblings
    • They did not have leftovers for dinner
  • Wanting certain material things was a motivating factor, but it was never the end goal
    • It was never only about status and money
  • “Now it’s about the glory, the name on the back of my jersey, it’s about me establishing who I am,” – Chris Bosh
  • Young athletes think they do not have to work after they “make it”
    • Continue to work after you succeed
    • Once you make millions of dollars, it only gets harder
  • For Bosh, it was about putting everything into the game and hoping to get something in return

Emulating Others Before Becoming Your Own Person

  • “We all have influences if we are lucky,”– Chris Bosh
  • People called him “KG” in high school because he wanted to emulate Kevin Garnett
  • What is the relationship between emulation and creation?
    • When emulation becomes a part of you, when you stop thinking about it; you put your own spin on it
  • Your personality will get through and get across eventually if you:
    • Do not copy everything, copy only the things you like
    • Test them, test the data, and see how it works in real-world situations
  • “The ultimate pinnacle for the athlete is to go out there and express yourself without thinking,” – Chris Bosh

Gut Feelings Versus Analytical Thinking

  • Why did Bosh choose to go to ACC (Atlantic Coast Conference)?
    • He knew he had to go to ACC if he wanted to end up in NBA.
    • That was where all the talent was
  • Bosh always listened to his gut instinct
  • Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking by Malcolm Gladwell influenced Bosh greatly
    • You already know the answer to your question, deep down
    • Bosh agrees with Gladwell that you make a better decision with snap judgments, instead of over-analyzing
    • It is the secondary thought and overthinking, that tricks us
    • This was something that always felt natural to him

College basketball Versus Professional Basketball

  • In college basketball, you take classes, and you have other obligations
  • Professional basketball is all about the game and everything around it
  • When you go professional, the business changes entirely; It’s about:
    • Performance
    • Consistency
    • Doing your job
    • Making sure you’re helping your team to win
  • If you are not at your best, you will get moved/traded- this is the hard reality

Fundamentals as the Keys to Greatness

  • “Do not get bored with the process” – Erik Spoelstra (head coach for the Miami Heat)
    • That is a huge part of where greatness lies
  • Spoelstra warned Bosh about the fundamentals of the game
  • Tim Duncan, got his nickname ‘The Big Fundamental’ because his fundamental skills were so sound
    • The fundamentals are the keys to greatness
    • Many great NBA players do not get enough credit for their fundamentals
  • “Jordan was the most fundamentally sound player I have ever seen,” – Chris Bosh
  • What to look for in a skilled player:
    • Where he catches the ball
    • His pivoting
    • His footwork
    • The way he shoots and keeps the ball
  • The showmanship is just the icing on the cake
  • The reason Michael Jordan was so successful was because of his fundamentals, how he disabled other players with angles and footwork

Basketball and Social Media

  • The possibility of sharing everything through social media made Bosh disinterested
    • Everybody wants the “Air Jordan” moment, but not everyone will put in the work
  • Raising the trophy can be the easiest thing in the world, but to get to that part, it takes hard work
    • Even after you become successful, face the fact that it will not make your life perfect.
  • What to do when you realize you did not enjoy the “ride” to the top, or when you think everyone is happier than you?
    • Stay aware of your emotions and moods, face them, work with them

What Sets the Champions Teams Apart From the Other Teams?

  • Having a clear goal right from the beginning
  • Day-to-day work and having the attitude of a winner
  • Things Bosh learned as a leader in Toronto Raptors:
    • Setting the tone
    • What it takes to be a leader
    • Attitude for embracing hard situations
    • Not quitting, continuing to do your job
  • “When the tough get going, go and get tough,”– Chris Bosh
  • “I used to hate cliches, now I love them,”– Chris Bosh

How do You Stay Strong After Losing?

  • Chris talks about how athletes adapt to losing
  • The big secret is to work now and worry later (do not look worried on the court, mid-game)
    • Evaluate what you did wrong, but only after it is all over
    • In the meantime, keep your presence on the court
    • Keep thinking about what you need to do to change the outcome
    • Always find reasons to keep doing what you are supposed to do
  • In basketball, your job is to put the ball through the hoop and win
  • It’s about mental fortitude, the ability to execute solutions when in the face of uncertainty
  • “Keep your shoulders back, and your head up, never slouch…” – Chris Bosh

The Source of Confidence

  • He doesn’t know what gave him his confidence, but he knows what took it away.
  • Confidence comes via working on your craft, studying, putting in the work
    • That is why he did 1000s of shots, drills, etc.
    • Because when he enters the court, he needs to know that he can do the task they assigned him
    • Mental training is an important aspect
    • Continuing to stay with the fundamentals even when you feel you should do more
    • Getting out of bed when you feel like not getting out of bed
  • The days you don’t feel like it, those are the days you have to work
    • That is when the magic happens, according to Bosh

Lessons From LeBron James

  • The amount of joy and excitement LeBron had for the game impressed Bosh greatly
    • He wanted to make sure that he, too, was enjoying basketball as LeBron did
  • LeBron practiced a lot. He, Dwyane Wade, and Ray Allen always gave him a reason to strive for more
    • He learned the importance of routine, hard work, and taking care of your body

You Never Know When It’s The Last Time

  • Bosh played his last game without realizing it
    • His career ended because of a series of medical issues (blood clots)
  • You never know when your last time doing something is going to be
    • Talk to your parents
    • Get that hug from a loved one
    • Stop for a minute and get that feeling

Thinking About The Future

  • What do you want to be remembered for?
  • Bosh wants to be a multi-faceted person
    • He wants to continue to inspire people to chase their dreams
    • He wants to be remembered as someone who did his best, who went the extra mile to help other people, someone who was always available to his family and friends
  • “Hopefully that’s the thing that people do if they think of me, or when they think of me when I’m gone,”– Chris Bosh
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Notes By Dario

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