NO EXCUSES | Jocko Willink on The James Altucher Show

Check out The James Altucher Show Episode Page & Show Notes

Key Takeaways

  • Each day, try to spend more time producing than consuming:
    • It’s good to consume podcasts or videos that educate you, but don’t spend all your time consuming information. Make time to produce your own podcast, videos, etc.
      • “You have to make sure it’s not a deficit where all you’re doing is consuming and you’re not producing anything” – Jocko Willink
  • Don’t chase short-term highs. Do things that will benefit and improve your life in the long run:
    • “Short-term gratification is not long-term success and it’s not long-term happiness”Jocko Willink
  • If you want to become a better leader, be more humble. If you’re humble, you’ll listen to other people and take responsibility for things that went wrong instead of blaming other people.
    • And if you aren’t in a leadership position, understand that being humble increases your chances of getting promoted. If you were a boss, who would you prefer to hire: the person who blames other people for a problem or the person who takes ownership over a situation and explains how they’ll do better next time around?
      • “If I recognize that someone has no humility and is not going to listen, I’ll probably fire them pretty quickly” Jocko Willink

Intro

Books Mentioned

Universal Life Lessons

  • Jocko calls his book Discipline Equals Freedom his operating system for life
    • In the book you’ll find Jocko’s workout routine, eating routine, and other regular habits
  • Although James comes from a completely different background than Jocko, James says he’s come to similar life lessons from the business world
    • Common life lessons:
      • Look at the positive in every situation
      • Take small steps to reach a bigger goal
      • Take full responsibility for your life
        • “I don’t think that’s very strange at all. I think it actually speaks to the nature of some foundational truths in the way the world operates.” – Jocko Willink

Life Advice 

  • Each day, try to spend more time producing than consuming:
    • It’s good to consume podcasts or videos that educate you, but don’t spend all your time consuming information. Make time to produce your own podcast, videos, etc.
      • “You have to make sure it’s not a deficit where all you’re doing is consuming and you’re not producing anything” – Jocko Willink
  • You don’t have to stay the same person your entire life:
    • As a kid, Jocko was super rebellious and didn’t care much for school or learning
    • Now, he’s incredibly disciplined and spends a lot of his time reading and writing books
  • Don’t chase short-term highs. Do things that will benefit and improve your life in the long run:
    • “Short-term gratification is not long-term success and it’s not long-term happiness”Jocko Willink
  • Take ownership of your life:
    • But how do you take ownership when something horrible happens to someone else, like your child getting cancer? Take ownership of how you respond to it. 
  • When you lose someone close to you, it’s important to remember them but you can’t dwell on their death: 
    • Just because you’ve adapted and moved on with your life, it doesn’t mean their loss didn’t matter or you forgot about them. It means you accepted the reality that they are no longer alive and they can continue to live in your memory.
      • Jocko has a section in his book called “Death” where he shares advice on how to deal with loss. When he lost a close friend, he opened his book and had to take his own advice.

Stay Humble

  • Don’t use age as an exercise not to learn or try something new:
    • Jocko started a podcast in his 40s
    • Jocko got into archery recently
      • Whenever trying something new, be humble and ready to learn
  • As a leadership consultant, Jocko doesn’t just walk into a new business and tell them how they can run it better. He spends time asking questions and learning about their different problems. Only then does he give advice.
    • As a leader, you’ll be more respected if you’re humble. If you act like you know everything and make a decision even though other employees know it isn’t the right move, they will see through it and lose trust in your leadership ability.
      • “You have to really put your ego in check” – Jocko Willink
  • If you want to become a better leader, be more humble. If you’re humble, you’ll listen to other people and take responsibility for things that went wrong instead of blaming other people.
    • And if you aren’t in a leadership position, understand that being humble increases your chances of getting promoted. If you were a boss, who would you prefer to hire: the person who blames other people for a problem or the person who takes ownership over a situation and explains how they’ll do better next time around?
      • “If I recognize that someone has no humility and is not going to listen, I’ll probably fire them pretty quickly” Jocko Willink

Jocko’s Children’s Books

  • Jocko is the author of several children’s books including his newest book Way of the Warrior Kid 4 Field Manual 
  • Jocko started writing children’s books because he had kids of his own and wanted to instill in them a certain set of values
  • Even though the books are written for kids, Jocko has received a ton of letters from adults about how his children’s books changed their life

Additional Notes

  • As a business leader, you need to be confident enough to take some risks and try new things. But, you also have to be humble enough to admit when something doesn’t work and either pivot or shut it down.
  • Jocko and Tulsi Gabbard ended up on Joe Rogan’s podcast after someone made the suggestion on Twitter and Joe said he was game
  • If someone has a different viewpoint than you, don’t hate them for it. Listen and try to understand where they’re coming from.

James Altucher Show : , , , ,
Notes By Alex Wiec

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