What You Need to Know About Eating Fish and Taking Fish Oil | Paul Greenberg on The Doctor’s Farmacy

Key Takeaways

  • Omega-3 fatty acids lower risk of cancer, type 2 diabetes, inflammation, and heart disease – among much more. Fish and seafood are excellent dietary sources of Omega-3 fatty acids.
  • Swapping in high-quality fish for beef can provide a better source of protein and nutrients per calorie
  • Stick to “SMASH” fish: wild salmon, mackerel, anchovies, sardines, and herring

Introduction

Paul Greenberg (@4fishgreenberg) is a New York Times bestselling author of Four Fish, American Catch, and The Omega Principle. Paul is also the winner of a James Beard Award for Writing and Literature, a Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation, and the writer-in-residence at the Safina Center.

In this episode, Dr. Mark Hyman and Paul Greenberg discuss fish consumption and whether fish supplementation is right for you.

Host: Mark Hyman, MD (@drmarkhyman

Dietary Importance of Fish and Seafood

  • Fish and seafood are one of the best dietary sources of protein and full of nutrients like iodine, selenium, and vitamins D and B12
  • Swapping in high-quality fish for beef can provide a better source of protein and nutrients per calorie
  • Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for cellular function in the body and lower risk of cancer, type 2 diabetes, inflammation, and heart disease – among much more
  • Recommended dose/servings: 2-3 portions of oily fish per week

What Fish Should We Eat?

  • Avoid larger fish which are higher on the food chain and accumulate more mercury and other toxins
  • General rule of thumb: if the whole fish can fit in your pan, it’s probably a good choice
  • For starters, Alaskan sockeye salmon and Wild Alaskan pink salmon
  • Canned tuna is very high in mercury, swap pink or sockeye canned salmon instead of canned tuna
  • Canned salmon is higher in omega-3 fatty acids versus canned tuna
  • Farmed versus wild salmon: still gives you a good source of omega-3 but will also get high doses of omega-6 fatty acids which have negative side effects
  • Anchovies: low in mercury, full of omega-3’s
  • “SMASH fish”: wild salmon, mackerel, anchovies, sardines, and herring 
  • Mussels also have great benefits while imputing less damage to the ecosystem

Fish Oil Supplementation

  • Omega-3 deficiency is a huge contributor to health problems including mood, brain development, nerve function, inflammation regulation, heart health, brain health, and cancer
  • People on a vegan diet are particularly vulnerable to omega-3 deficiency
  • It’s best to get your levels checked before choosing a regimen
  • Studies have shown that even if you don’t eat fish but take fish oil supplementS, you will still get the benefits
Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, MD : , , , ,
Notes By Maryann

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