A Conversation with Joe Rogan – The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast (Part 1)

Check out The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast Episode Page & Show Notes

Key Takeaways

  • It takes Joe about 6 months to master his material for the hour-long comedy specials he does Netflix (he’s currently working on his next)
  • There are 3 levels to a career in comedy:
    • In the beginning, you’re scared and just fighting to get laughs from anything
    • In the middle, you start telling jokes that you think are funny and enjoy
    • Lastly, in stage three, you take ideas and add a slight twist of humor in order to make them entertaining
  • Joe’s podcast gets 200+ million downloads a month
  • There’s a huge interest in long-form conversations that podcasts are only now starting to satisfy
    • “You really only get cooking after the first half hour or forty minutes… Often times the last hour of a three-hour podcast is the best hour”

Intro

  • Joe Rogan (@joerogan) is a stand-up comedian, mixed martial arts (MMA) color commentator, and host of The Joe Rogan Experience (check out the Podcast Notes)

Books Mentioned:

What is Joe up to?

  • Joe is currently working on his fourth Netflix comedy special
    • It takes him about a month to create 10 minutes of comedy material (so ~6 months to create/hone/master his hour-long comedy specials)
      • “Comedy is not something you can’t do in a vacuum, it has to come alive in front of the audience”
  • There are 3 levels to a career in comedy:
    • In the beginning, you’re scared and just fighting to get laughs from anything
    • In the middle, you start telling jokes that you think are funny and enjoy
    • Lastly, in stage three, you take ideas and add a slight twist of humor in order to make them entertaining
  • One of Joe’s favorite comedians is Sarah Silverman
  • Joe loves the difficulty and challenge of creating something great that makes people laugh and temporarily escape the hardships of life

Joe’s Background

  • Joe was born in New Jersey but grew up in California, Florida, and Boston
    • After living in New Jersey, Joe moved to San Francisco – this was during the 1970s (aka the hippie movement)
    • Then Joe, his mother, and step-father moved to Gainesville, Florida and then on to Boston
      • He thinks of Boston as the place he really grew up because he started doing comedy and mixed martial arts (MMA) there
  • Joe’s parents split up at an early age (he hasn’t spoken to his dad since he was 7-years-old)
    • He instead looks up to his step-father and really admires the way he treated his mother – he thinks of them as the ideal relationship
  • Joe has been married to his wife for about 10 years and they have two daughters together
  • Joe calls Jordan Peterson the “most represented friend that he has” since he believes in Jordan’s message, but the mainstream is constantly misrepresenting his lessons

The Joe Rogan Experience

  • Joe estimates that his podcast gets 200+ million downloads a month
    • He’s been doing the podcast for about 10 years now (but only started putting the interviews on YouTube about 4 years ago)
  • 5 years ago, people told Joe that he was wasting his time with podcasting (Oh how the story has changed. Today, people constantly come up to him to tell him they’re a fan of the show.)
  • There’s a huge interest in long-form conversations that podcasts are only now starting to satisfy
    • “You really only get cooking after the first half hour or forty minutes… Often times the last hour of a three-hour podcast is the best hour”
  • It’s very rare to have a 3-hour one-on-one conversation with someone and have no distractions, but podcasts let you do exactly that

Additional Notes

  • Jordan Peterson has given over 300 public lectures and hasn’t really experienced any major negative events (aside from one heckler) even though the mainstream media is constantly creating scandals surrounding him
  • Joe recommends watching the documentary Icarus to learn about how Russia cheated in the Sochi Olympics
    • Another thing that bothers Joe about the Olympics is the fact that athletes work on their sport as a full-time job, but most barely make enough money to get by while the Olympic committee profits heavily from the event
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