Seth Godin on How to Think Small to Go Big

Seth Godin (@thisissethsblog) is the author of 17 bestselling books that have been translated into more than 35 languages. He writes about the way ideas spread, marketing, strategic quitting, leadership, and — most of all — challenging the status quo in all areas. His books include Linchpin, Tribes, The Dip, Purple Cow, and What to Do When it’s Your Turn (and it’s Always Your Turn).

Seth has founded several companies, including Yoyodyne and Squidoo. His blog (which you can find by typing “Seth” into Google) is one of the most popular in the world. In 2013, Godin was inducted into the Direct Marketing Hall of Fame. Recently, Godin turned the book publishing world on its ear by launching a series of four books via Kickstarter. The campaign reached its goal in just three hours and became the most successful book project in Kickstarter history.

You’ll find pithy, actionable things that you can implement, such has how to keep track of the right things and how to create a narrative that serves you best. It’s very simple, but it’s a foundational skill and mindset.

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Tim Ferriss: How to Cage the Monkey Mind

Tim visited the Googleplex — the Mountain View-based headquarters of Google — and had a public chat. I was interviewed and made sure that we covered some ground that has not been discussed before. There were questions such as:

What has been the most important Stoic teaching that I’ve come across?
How do I manage the many requests I receive?
What are the factors or elements that have led to the success of the podcast?
Where do I see myself in five years?
If I could pick three people — alive or dead — to be in my personal board of directors, who would they be?
How do I experiment with my dog training?
What are my recommendations for longevity?
How do I fight insomnia?

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The Tim Ferris Show: How Philosphy Can Change Your LIfe, with Alain de Botton

Alain de Botton is a not a philosopher’s philosopher. This means that his work is given little consideration inside academia. It also means that he speaks to many, many more people—ordinary people hungry for humanist ideas about living—than his peers. In this podcast “How Philosophy can change your life”, de Botton tells us that he’d always looked to philosophy as a discipline that “has wise things to say about everyday worries…. Philosophy promised something that might sound a little naïve, but was in fact rather profound: A way to learn to be happy.” I’m still not sure if this sounds more naïve or profound, but de Botton’s thoughts, concern thinkers who surely knew the difference.

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