The Very Useful – Volume 02 – Audiobooks

  Start by getting setup with Audible– Especially if you have any degree of commute, then I can’t recommend Audible enough. Listening to books is infinitely more productive and enjoyable than mediocre radio stations. There are different tiers of subscriptions, but the lowest level has been fine for me. As much as we LOVE podcasts, Audiobooks … Continue reading The Very Useful – Volume 02 – Audiobooks

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Dan Ariely | Payoff (Episode 561)

We may think of ourselves as logical and reasonable, going through motions governed by what we believe to be right. But if we were to examine them under a microscope, would our motivations prove to be composed of a rational framework, or are there invisible, inscrutable reasons for our behavior even we can’t explain?

How does the What the Hell effect keep us making bad decisions even when we know they’re bad?
Are we ever truly rational, unbiased, or impartial?
What’s the best time to appear before a judge?
Transparency in our lives can often backfire.
How motivation works (and doesn’t work) and how we can use our own psychology against ourselves.
And so much more…

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Time-Restricted Eating in Humans & Breast Cancer Prevention‬

Dr. Ruth Patterson, a professor in the UC San Diego Department of Family Medicine and Public Health as well as Associate Director of Population Sciences and leader of the Cancer Prevention program at Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health. If you enjoyed my last episode with Dr. Satchin Panda, I have good news! This will also be a great episode for you, since we talk about some similar ideas, but focus more on the human side of things, especially when it comes to time-restricted eating, since Dr. Patterson does primarily clinical research. In this 45-minute podcast, we talk about… The importance of time-restricted eating as a practical public health intervention, mostly for it’s ease of implementation, that may have a widespread impact on disease risk. Why you should probably make sure your time-restricted eating window occurs earlier in the day, rather than later. How the first 5% drop in weight loss can have disproportionately large effects on the metabolic factors associated with breast cancer risk when compared with subsequent weight loss. The association of longer fasting durations beginning earlier in the evening and improved sleep in humans, as well as spontaneous physical activity in their day-to-day lives. The relationship between metabolism and breast cancer risk. The effect of lifestyle factors, such as obesity, physical activity, what and even when you eat, whether or not you smoke tobacco… and how even modest changes, such as consuming food earlier in the day and only during an 11-hour window, can decrease breast cancer risk and recurrence by as much as 36%. The importance of starting your fast earlier in the evening, and how an earlier eating window has been shown to correlate to reductions in inflammatory markers.

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The power of the Ketogenic Diet with Dr. Dom D’Agostino

Dr. Dominic “Dom” D’Agostino (@DominicDAgosti2) is an assistant professor in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology at the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, and a senior research scientist at the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC). He has also deadlifted 500 pounds for 10 reps after a seven-day fast.

Dom focuses on ketosis, ketones, and the ketogenic diet — so you can consider this a ketosis master class (especially if you combine both episodes, though this one does stand alone).

If you have an interest in these types of metabolic therapies, whether for performance enhancement, endurance, weight loss, or fighting cancer, diabetes, or any number of other maladies, you will find a gem within this episode.

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Tim Ferriss Show: The Tattooed Heretic of Wine and Whiskey, Richard Betts

Richard Betts (@yobetts) served as the wine director at The Little Nell in Aspen from 2000 to 2008. He also passed the Court of Master Sommeliers’ Masters Exam on his first attempt, becoming the ninth person in history ever to do so.

In this conversation, Tim goes into fascinating details about drinking, tasting and buying wines, whiskey and mezcal. Did you know it’s spelled “whiskey” when from countries that have “e” in their names (e.g. America) but “whisky” when from countries that don’t have an “e” in their names (e.g. Scotland, Japan)? Now you know.

Last but not least, Richard is the author of a brand-new book, “The Essential Scratch & Sniff Guide to Becoming a Whiskey Know-It-All,” It distills (see what I did there?) a couple of lifetimes worth of study down to 24 pages…then makes them smell good. Definitely check it out. At the very least, it gives you a bunch of rules of thumb (like the whiskey vs. whisky trick), so you can impress your friends and not look like a dumb-ass at the bar. Sweet! Less dumb-ass and more smart-ass is always good. Get ‘er done.

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Startalk: Edward Snowden (Part 2)

Neil deGrasse Tyson’s exclusive, one-on-one conversation with whistleblower Edward Snowden – via robotic telepresence from Moscow – concludes with a deeper dive into metadata, personal privacy and covert communications. Join us as Edward takes us further down the rabbit hole, where countries spy on their own citizens to protect them and “mere” metadata can be more intrusive and invasive than the actual content of a phone call. Decipher the differences between symmetric encryption, asymmetric encryption and secret sharing schemes. But this episode isn’t just advanced math and n-dimensional matrices – Neil and Edward leave Earth behind and dive into the wavelengths of pulsars and cosmic background radiation in search of the perfect random number generator for an ideal seed value. Plus, Neil and Edward discuss the difficulty of separating the signal from the noise, both in astrophysics and in government mass surveillance.

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Startalk Podcast: Edward Snowden

Neil deGrasse Tyson chats with whistleblower Edward Snowden via robotic telepresence from Moscow. The two card-carrying members of the geek community discuss Isaac Newton, the difference between education and learning, and even how knowledge is created. They also dive into the Periodic Table and chemistry, before moving on to the more expected subjects of data compression, encryption and privacy. You’ll learn about the relationship between private contractors, the CIA, and the NSA, for whom Edward began working at only 16 years old. Edward explains why metadata tells the government much more about individuals than they claim, and why there’s a distinction between the voluntary disclosure of information and the involuntary subversion of individual intent. Part 1 ends with a conversation about Ben Franklin, the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the CIA’s oath of service, and government Standard Form 312, which is the agreement Snowden violated.

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